Best answer: Why does my baby have red spots on face?

Many newborns develop a blotchy red skin reaction called erythema toxicum, which can appear between 2 days and 2 weeks after birth. Flat, red patches or small bumps often first appear on the face and spread to the body and limbs. The rash is harmless, not contagious, and will clear after a few days or a week.

Is it normal for babies to have red spots?

The baby’s skin looks blotchy.

During the first day or two of life, many babies get harmless red blotches with tiny bumps that sometimes contain pus. This is called erythema toxicum (say “air-uh-THEE-mah TOK-sik-um”). It may appear on only part of the body or on most of the body.

What to do if baby has red spots?

When to Worry About Baby’s Rash

Small red or purplish dots over the body (”petechiae”) can be caused by a viral infection or a potentially very serious bacterial infection. These will not lighten with pressure. Any infant with possible petechiae should be evaluated by a doctor immediately.

How can you tell if a rash is serious?

Serious Rash Symptoms

  1. You have a rash that covers the body. This indicates something concerning, such as an infection or allergic reaction.
  2. You have a fever with the rash. If this is the case, go to the emergency room. …
  3. The rash is sudden and spreads rapidly. …
  4. The rash is painful. …
  5. The rash is infected.
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What does a baby viral rash look like?

Viral rashes look spotty. These “spots” are often red or pink on babies with lighter skin, and dark red, purple, or brown on babies with darker skin. They tend to spread across larger areas of the body, including the chest or back, and cover both the left and right sides of the body.

What does infantile acne look like?

What does infantile acne look like? Infantile acne presents with whiteheads, blackheads, red papules and pustules, nodules and sometimes cysts that may lead to long term scarring. It most commonly affects the cheeks, chin and forehead with less frequent involvement of the body.