Frequent question: Is Baby tongue tie surgery necessary?

Babies with tongue-ties rarely need surgery to help them feed, a US study suggests. It found two-thirds of babies referred for the procedure did not need it and were able to feed with other support. Tongue-tie occurs when the strip of skin connecting the tongue and the floor of the mouth is shorter than usual.

Should I get my baby tongue-tie snipped?

Medical experts don’t routinely ‘snip’ a tongue-tie, but the procedure is often recommended to improve breastfeeding. Nardone takes out surgical scissors. She isolated the frenulum, cut the cord, and then dabbed a bit of blood away with a gauze.

What happens if you don’t fix tongue-tie?

Some of the problems that can occur when tongue tie is left untreated include the following: Oral health problems: These can occur in older children who still have tongue tie. This condition makes it harder to keep teeth clean, which increases the risk of tooth decay and gum problems.

Is fixing a tongue-tie necessary?

A tight frenulum can keep the tongue back in the mouth, causing a poor seal and a shallow latch. But while all the experts agree tongue-ties can cause a problem, some worry the procedures to fix them are done too often and sometimes aren’t necessary.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Does intermittent fasting affect breastfeeding?

At what age can tongue-tie be treated?

Tongue-tie occurs when a string of tissue under the tongue stops the tongue from moving well. Tongue-tie can improve on its own by the age of two or three years. Severe cases of tongue-tie can be treated by cutting the tissue under the tongue (the frenum). This is called a frenectomy.

Are tongue ties genetic?

Anyone can develop tongue-tie. In some cases, tongue-tie is hereditary (runs in the family). The condition occurs up to 10 percent of children (depending on the study and definition of tongue-tie). Tongue-tie mostly affects infants and younger children, but older children and adults may also live with the condition.

What problems can a tongue-tie cause?

A tongue-tie can diminish a person’s ability to brush food debris off their teeth, and to swallow completely. An inability to keep the mouth clean can result in tooth decay, gum inflammation (gingivitis), and other oral problems.

Can a tongue-tie affect speech?

Tongue-tie will not affect a child’s ability to learn speech and will not cause speech delay, but it may cause issues with articulation, or the way the words are pronounced.

Does cutting tongue-tie hurt baby?

Tongue-tie division is done by doctors, nurses or midwives. In very young babies (those who are only a few months old), it is usually done without anaesthetic (painkilling medicine), or with a local anaesthetic that numbs the tongue. The procedure does not seem to hurt babies.

How painful is tongue tie surgery?

The entire procedure takes less than 15 seconds and does not require anesthesia. The frenulum is very thin and has few nerves, meaning there is very little pain associated with the procedure. Baby can breastfeed immediately after the procedure, and mothers often notice improvement with the first feed.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Does Motrin make babies sleepy?

How long does tongue tie surgery take?

Laser Reduces Bleeding and Pain

For your safety, you won’t be able to stay in the room during tongue tie surgery. (We have to follow laser safety guidelines.) However, you can feel peace of mind knowing that the tongue tie procedure typically only takes 1 to 2 minutes.

Do pediatricians fix tongue tie?

If the consultant suspects a tongue tie, she’ll typically refer mom and baby to a pediatric dentist or an otolaryngologist (an ear, nose, and throat doctor), who will perform a procedure to “clip” the stringlike piece of tissue underneath the tongue.

What does tongue-tie look like in newborn?

Identifying tongue tie

When your baby tries to lift his tongue or move it forwards it may appear misshapen, short or heart-shaped, with the frenulum clearly pulling its centre down and restricting its movement. Or you may be able to see or feel firm tissue where his tongue meets the floor of his mouth.