Can babies have sinus problems?

Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Like sinusitis in adults, pediatric sinusitis can be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may be caused by other problems, such as a viral illness or allergy.

Can babies have sinus infections?

It’s possible, but rare, for babies to get sinus infections because their sinuses aren’t fully formed. Sinusitis can be caused by either a virus or bacteria. Some children get recurring sinus infections.

When can babies get sinus infections?

Cold-related headaches in young kids usually aren’t sinus infections. That’s because the sinuses in the forehead don’t start developing until kids are 9 or 12 years old and aren’t formed enough to get infected until the early teen years.

Do babies need antibiotics for sinus infection?

If your child has bacterial sinusitis, your pediatrician may prescribe an antibiotic for at least 10 days. Once your child is on the medication, symptoms should start to go away over the next 2 to 3 days—the nasal discharge will clear and the cough will improve.

What oil is good for sinus pressure?

Some essential oils, including eucalyptus and peppermint oils, may help open the airways and ease congestion. Essential oils are a popular natural treatment. People use them to relieve sinus congestion, unblock a stuffed nose, and promote sinus drainage. Eucalyptus and peppermint oils show particular promise.

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Can babies suffocate from congestion?

A baby’s nose, unlike an adult’s, doesn’t have cartilage. So when that nose is pressed against an object, like a stuffed animal, couch cushions or even a parent’s arm while sleeping in bed, it can flatten easily. With the opening to its nostrils blocked, the baby can’t breathe and suffocates.

Is nasal congestion normal in newborns?

Congestion is common in babies. Baby congestion is usually harmless, but it can sometimes be uncomfortable, causing a stuffy nose and noisy or rapid breathing. Babies may experience congestion in their nose (called nasal congestion), or it may sound as though the congestion is in their chest.

When should I worry about my baby’s congestion?

If your child’s stuffiness is accompanied by a fever, ear pain, a sore throat and/or swollen glands, or you suspect there is a foreign object stuck in her nose, call your pediatrician right away.